Iceland just announced a no-nonsense plan to eliminate its wage gap in 5 years.



<br>

On Oct. 24, 2016, thousands of Iceland’s women stopped working at 2:38 p.m.

At the time, the country’s men were earning an average of 18% more for doing the same jobs.

So women decided they were going to work 18% fewer hours (hence walking off the job at 2:38 p.m.) for a day to prove a powerful point.

Thousands took off early and poured into the streets to voice their displeasure with the wage gap (which, hey, is actually a lot better than in most of the world but still needs to be fixed).

In early March 2017, not even five months later, things may finally be changing, in no small part thanks to the work of these protestors.

Government officials in Iceland just announced new legislation that would require companies to open their books and prove they’re providing equal pay for equal work.

According to USA Today, the measure is expected to be approved by parliament because lawmakers across the political spectrum all agree that the wage gap needs to be fixed ASAP.

(That must be nice.)

“Equal rights are human rights,” said Social Affairs and Equality Minister Thorsteinn Viglundsson. “We need to make sure that men and women enjoy equal opportunity in the workplace. It is our responsibility to take every measure to achieve that.”

Iceland won’t be the first nation to enforce equal pay, but its policy is considered to be one of the most aggressive yet as it targets any company, public or private, with at least 25 employees.

The government is hoping measures like this one will help to completely eradicate the pay gap in the next five years.

This is a massive victory, not just for women, but for the power of engaged citizens who refuse to accept inequality.

The news out of Iceland comes hot off the heels of A Day Without a Woman, which called for women all over the world to strike — from work, from home duties, from the multitude of tasks they juggle day in and day out — to make their value known to the world in no uncertain terms.

❕❕❕

A post shared by Áslaug Lárusdóttir (@aslauglar_) on Oct 24, 2016 at 10:04am PDT

Critics of the strike questioned its ability to make a difference since turnout would be smaller and more scattered than the massive Women’s March that took place shortly after Inauguration Day.

But the citizens of Iceland are proof-positive that public demonstrations can and do work. It sounds trite, but when enough people come together to make their voices heard, people in power have no choice but to listen. Even if it seems like they’re not.

Change may not happen overnight, or even in five months as it did in Iceland, but as the saying goes, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

Sometimes, the arc just needs a couple thousand badass women forcing it to bend a little more quickly.

<br>



Source link

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares
Share This
Top 10 RAREST & MOST EXPENSIVE Cars In The World
10 Bizarrely-Named Bands
Top 10 Rappers That Went Broke
10 Smartest Criminals Ever
11 Photos That Show Japan Is Wonderfully Weird
Celebs Freestyle On The BET Awards Red Carpet
Booze Up Your Leftover Halloween Candy
I Spent The Day In Russia
offended by everything … 2
on point
me checking my abs
it was me
The Summer of Fails: Fails of the Week (July 2018) | FailArmy
Dressed For Success (July 2018) | FailArmy
Paraglider Problems: Fails of the Week (July 2018)
Sticks and Stones (July 2018) | FailArmy
How to Drift in the Rain | #ThrowbackThursday
Diver Fights Off Shark!
Surfer Makes The Best of Flood | Ocean/River Hybrid Surfing
Best Videos Compilation Week 2 July 2018 || JukinVideo