Finally, marriage equality is coming to Asia. These delightful pics say it all.


LGBTQ rights advocates won a major victory in Taiwan.

Taiwan is about to become the first country in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage.

On May 24, the island nation’s highest court ruled that prohibiting two people from marrying based on their gender is unconstitutional.

Photo by Chiang Ying-ying/AP.

The historic decision gives Taiwan’s parliament two years to either amend old laws or enact new ones to accommodate for the ruling.

The decision was met with an outpouring of tears, hugs, and cheers from LGBTQ people and their allies in Taipei.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

Photo by Ying-ying/AP.

Activist Chi Chia-wei brought a request to Taiwan’s highest court, challenging a provision that defined marriage as between a man and woman. Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

While the ruling was controversial — with a fair share of demonstrators protesting its potential passing in recent days — Taiwan is one of the most queer-friendly nations in the East. It boasts a large LGBTQ population and the biggest annual gay pride parade on the continent.

The decision’s implications for Asia as a whole are nothing short of monumental.

In Asia, LGBTQ rights haven’t progressed in the same ways or at the same speed as other regions of the world; some Asian countries are even going backward.

This week, for the first time ever, two men in Indonesia’s conservative province of Aceh were caught practicing gay sex and caned 83 times each in front of a packed town square as a consequence. While most of Indonesia doesn’t ban gay sex outright, Aceh adheres to Sharia.

On the same day that Taiwan’s court ruled in favor of marriage equality, South Korea’s military court sentenced a captain to prison for breaking its controversial “sodomy” ban — a measure Amnesty International has blasted as “a bigoted hunt to root out gay personnel.” In most Asian countries, including Japan and China, very few (if any) legislative steps have been taken to protect LGBTQ people as a marginalized minority.

Taiwan’s court ruling wasn’t just another inevitable step toward equality — it actively rejected the forces of a bigger regional trend chipping away at LGBTQ human rights.

Photo by Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images.

“In Asia, every country’s situation is different,” victorious activist Chi Chia-wei, who brought one of two petitions to the highest court, told the New York Times. “But this should certainly offer some encouragement to different societies to consider following in Taiwan’s footsteps and giving gays and lesbians the right to marry.”





Source link

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares
Share This
10 Ways Video Games Are Good For Your Health
10 Lies You Were Taught About The UK
10 Ways Vegans Are Ruining The World
10 Weirdest Things To Fall From The Sky
The Try Guys Alaskan Pun Challenge • The Try Vlog
We Survived With Infertility, And Now We Have Quadruplets
People Try Christmas Food From Around The World
Don’t Check Your Phone
Sucks To Be Them
This Lady Is Going All Out
Totally useless co-worker
Wash The Hell Out
Your Tooth Is Missing: Best Fails of the Week (November 2017) | FailArmy
A Boatload of Fails: Throwback Fails (November 2017) | FailArmy
Getting Away From Me Fails (November 2017 | FailArmy
The Best 29 Fall Fails: FailArmy Hall of Fame (November 2017)
Best Videos Compilation Week 2 November || JukinVideo
Bears Break Into A Car | “Make Them Get Out!”
David After the Dentist || Throwback Thursday
Long Double Back Flip FAIL